The Wash. Baseball Historical Society and Nats News

Background: The WBHS was founded by Tom Holster in 1996. The first edition of Nats News the quarterly newsletter was published in the summer of 1996. Tom ran the WBHS until the summer of 2001 when he decided to devote more time to family matters. James Hartley took up the reins in the late summer of 2001 and has been publishing the newsletter ever since.

I’ve personally “Mark Hornbaker” been a member of the WBHS since 2009 and I look forward in receiving the newest edition of Nats News every three months.

Did you know that every issue of Nats News is in the National Baseball Hall-of-Fame Library?
Want to subscribe to the Nats News?
If you do the easiest way is to send a check for $20 to

NATS NEWS – 9039 Sligo Creek Pkwy. #1116 – Silver Spring, MD 20901. It might be a good idea to include your name and address.

 

Stories about the Washington Baseball Historical Society

Q&A With Bob Levey
Washington Post Columnist
Tuesday, April 3, 2001; Noon EDT

“Levey Live” appears Tuesdays at noon EDT. Your host is Washington Post columnist Bob Levey. This hour is your chance to talk directly to key Washington Post reporters and editors, local officials and people in the news.

Today, Bob’s guest is founder of the Washington Baseball Historical Society, Tom Holster.

One hundred years ago, the Washington Senators first took the field. Thirty years ago they stepped down to become the Texas Rangers. On the night of what was to be the Senators’ final game, angry Washington fans stormed the field resulting in a forfeited game. Today, emotions still run high among Washington baseball aficionados. Join Levey and Holster as they take on the topic of baseball in Washington. To read more…

 

The Pining Ends On Opening Day

Die-Hard Senators Fan Finds Vindication

 

By C. Woodrow Irvin

Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, March 31, 2005; Page SM03

 

Tom Holster’s affair with baseball in Washington began around 1967. Like other 11-year-olds of his generation, Holster spent many nights listening to Washington Senators games on the radio.

Tom Holster photographs the infield at RFK Stadium, accompanied by Jim Hartley, head of the Washington Baseball Historical Society, and Hank Thomas, grandson of Walter Johnson, a Hall of Fame pitcher for the Senators. (James M. Thresher — The Washington Post)

“I fell in love with [6-foot-7-inch slugger] Frank Howard and all of them,” said Holster, 48, then of the Falls Church area but now a resident of Chantilly. “I would make up my own score sheets and sit there and keep score.”

Tom Holster photographs the infield at RFK Stadium, accompanied by Jim Hartley, head of the Washington Baseball Historical Society, and Hank Thomas, grandson of Walter Johnson, a Hall of Fame pitcher for the Senators. (James M. Thresher — The Washington Post)
On Sept. 30, 1971, Holster was holding one of those hand-drawn scorecards as he listened to the Senators play their last game, against the New York Yankees, before the team moved to Texas to become the Rangers. Holster could not record the last out, however, because dozens of Washington fans charged the field at RFK Stadium in anger and despair. The Senators were forced to forfeit.

 

 

  • Yardbirdsraveup

    Hi,

    I would like to know where I can look up information about a double header played at Griffith Stadium on July 19, 1961 against the Yankees. What I found interesting was that the Senators swept New York in front of the largest Griffith Stadium crowd that season. I would especially be interested in what Shirley Povich had to say about these two games.

  • George Case

    If you are interested in the box score – Retrosheet has the information. I would assume that the Washington Post would have information about a Shirley Povich piece about the doubleheader victory. My dad was the third base coach for Mickey Vernon that season for the “expansion” Washington Senators. Our website http://www.timelessbaseball.com has quite a bit of COLOR footage of Griffith Stadium and the “original” Washington Senators from the WWII era.

  • Dean

    My uncles were good friends with Mickey Vernon back in his hometown of Marcus Hook, PA. Mickey won two AL batting championships for the Senators and was a seven time American League All-Star with a career batting average of .286 combined with a .990 career fielding average that truly deserves to be enshrined at Cooperstown. The Senators were a second division team most years that Mickey played for them but had he been with a New York team no doubt he would be in the HOF by now. Vernon finally did get the chance at the big stage when he appeared as a player/coach for his long time crosstown friend Danny Murtaugh as the Pirates defeated the Yankees in the 1960 World Series. Mickey later managed the expansion Washington Senators in the early sixties.